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The University of Minnesota Monarch Lab

Biology & Research

Biology & Research

Learn more about the complex biology and natural history of monarchs, from identifying instars to following their migration patterns, and learn about what researchers are studying.

Education & Gardening

Education & Gardening

Monarchs and gardens can be useful educational tools in both formal classroom settings and informal learning environments. This page provides more information on Monarch Lab workshops, curriculum guides, and butterfly gardening.

MLMP

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project

The MLMP is a program in which volunteer citizen scientists collect and report real scientific data on monarch egg and larval distribution and abundance from their monarch breeding habitat(s).

Store

Monarch Store

A place to buy all of your monarch-related things! Shop for curriculum guides, monitoring supplies, other educational materials and more.

Where Are All The Monarchs?

On March 9th 2016, just days after we’d heard the good news that monarch numbers had rebounded to cover just over 4 hectares of forest in the mountains of central Mexico; a huge winter storm hit their wintering sites and the surrounding area. The storm began with rain and was followed by hail, snow, and sub-freezing temperatures. The freezing temperatures killed many monarchs and the strong winds caused trees to topple over, losing monarch habitat. Because the spring migration from Mexico just started, the full population was in the storm's path. Read More.

Latest News

Milkweed Courses Available at St. Olaf

Tuesday, May 10, 2016 11:52 am

Attention Minnesota Teachers, We are pleased to share an opportunity for two free workshops for teachers this summer at St. Olaf College, Northfield, MN.  Both offer stipends for participation. Read More »

From Our Blog

Where Are All The Monarchs?

Thursday, July 14, 2016 3:17 pm

On March 9th 2016, just days after we’d heard the good news that monarch numbers had rebounded to cover just over 4 hectares of forest in the mountains of central Mexico; a huge winter storm hit their wintering sites and the surrounding area. The storm began with rain and was followed by hail, snow, and sub-freezing temperatures. The freezing temperatures killed many monarchs and the strong winds caused trees to topple over, losing monarch habitat. Because the spring migration from Mexico just started, the full population was in the storm's path. Read More »

About

About Us

Meet Monarch Lab staff and students and get to know our history.

Donate

Donate

Many different Monarch Lab programs will benefit from a financial contribution. Read more about how to support our work.

Conservation

Monarch Conservation

The UMN Monarch Lab is a partner of the Monarch Joint Venture, a national partnership working to conserve the monarch migration in the U.S.

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