University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000

Publications / References

Growth and Development
Interactions with Milkweed
Parasites and Natural Enemies
Reproductive Biology
Conservation
Migration
Population Dynamics
Overwintering
Education & Outreach
Vital Statistics/Measuring

Interactions with Milkweed

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Alonso-Mejia, A. 1996. Biology and conservation of overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico. Ph.D. thesis, University of Florida.
  • Malcolm, S.B., & M.P. Zalucki. 1996. Milkweed latex and cardenolide induction may resolve the lethal plant defense paradox. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 80:193-196.
  • Malcolm, S.B. 1995. Milkweeds, monarch butterflies and the ecological significance of cardenolides. Chemoecology 5/6:101-117.
  • Alonso-Mejia, A. and L.P Brower. 1994. From model to mimic: age dependent unpalatability in monarch butterflies. Experientia 50:176-181
  • Dussourd, D.E. 1993. Foraging with finesse: Caterpillar adaptations for circumventing plant defenses. Pages 92-131, in, N.E. Stamp & T.M. Casey (editors), Caterpillars. Ecological and Evolutionary Constraints on Foraging. New York: Chapman & Hall.
  • Zalucki, M.P., & L.P. Brower. 1992. Survival of the first instar larvae of Danaus plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danainae) in relation to cardiac glycoside and latex content of Asclepias humistrata (Asclepiadaceae). Chemoecology 3:81-93.
  • Malcolm, S.B. 1991. Cardenolide-mediated interactions between plants and herbivores. Pages 251-296, in: G.A. Rosenthal & M.R. Berenbaum (eds), Herbivores: Their interactions with secondary plant metabolites, 2nd edition. Volume I: The Chemical Participants. Academic Press, San Diego.
  • Van Hook, T. and M.P. Zalucki. 1991. Oviposition by Danaus plexippus on Asclepias viridis in northern Florida. J. Lep. Soc. 45:215-221.
  • Oyeyele, S.O. and M.P. Zalucki 1990. Cardiac glycosides and oviposition by Danaus plexippus onAsclepias fruticosa in south-east Queensland (Australia). with notes on the effect of plant nitrogen content. Ecol. Ent. 15:177-185.
  • Zalucki, M.P., L.P. Brower, & S.B. Malcolm. 1990. Oviposition by Danaus plexippus in relation to cardenolide content of three Asclepias species in the southeastern USA. Ecological Entomology15:231-240.
  • Malcolm, S.B., & L.P. Brower. 1989. Evolutionary and ecological implications of cardenolide sequestration in the monarch butterfly. Experientia 45:284-295.
  • Malcolm, S.B., B.J. Cockrell, & L.P. Brower. 1989. The cardenolide fingerprint of monarch butterflies reared on the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca. Journal of Chemical Ecology 15:819-853.
  • Glendinning, J, A. Alonso-M, and L.P. Brower. 1988. Behavioral and ecological interactions of foraging mice with overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico. Oecologia 75:222-227.
  • Turner, J. 1984. Mimicry: the palatability spectrum and its consequences. Pages 141-162 in R. Vane-Wright and P. Ackery (editors), The biology of butterflies. Academic Press.
  • Fink, L and L.P. Brower. 1981. Birds can overcome the cardenolide defense of monarch butterflies in Mexico. Nature 291:67-70.
  • Roeske, C.N., Seiber, Brower, L.P. and Moffit, C.M. 1976. Milkweed cardenolides and their comparative processing by monarch butterflies. Rec. Adv. Phytochem. 10: 93-167.
  • Brower, L.P., & S.C. Glazier. 1975. Localization of heart poisons in the monarch butterfly. Science188:19-24.
  • Rothschild, M., J. Von Euw, T. Reichstein, D. Smith and J. Pierre. 1975. Cardenolide storage in Danaus chyrsippus with additional notes on D. plexippus. Proc. R. Soc. (B). 190: 1-31.
  • Brower, L.P. and C.M. Moffit. 1974. Palatability dynamics of cardenolides in the monarch butterfly.Nature. 249:280-283.
  • Brower, L.P., P.B. McEvoy, K.L. Williamson and M.A. Flannery. 1972. Variation in cardiac glycoside content of monarch butterflies from natural populations in eastern North America. Science 177:426-429.
  • Brower, L.P. 1969. Ecological chemistry. Scientific American 220:22-29.
  • Parsons, J.A. 1965. A digitalis-like toxin in the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. J. Physiol. 178: 290-304.
  • Poulton, E.B. 1909. Mimicry in butterflies of North America. Ann. Ent. Soc. Am. 2:203-242.

Parasites and Natural Enemies

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Prudic, K.L. & Olson, C. (2005) A new parasitoid of Danaus gilippus thersippus (Nymphalidae: Danainae) in Southeastern Arizona. Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society, 59, 118–119.
  • Jaenike, J. 1998. On the capacity of macroparasites to control insect populations. American Naturalist 151(1) 84-96.
  • Leong KLH. Yoshimura M.A. Kaya H.K. and Williams, H. 1997. Instar susceptibility of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) to the neogregarine parasite, Ophryocystis elektroscirrha. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 69(1) 79-83.
  • Calvert, W.H. 1996. Fire ant predation on monarch larvae (Nymphalidae: Danainae) in a central Texas prairie. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society. 50(2) 149-151.
  • Frick C. Wink M. 1995. Uptake and sequestration of ouabain and other cardiac glycosides in Danaus plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danaidae): Evidence for a carrier-mediated process. Journal of Chemical Ecology 21(5). 557-575.
  • Alonso-Mejia A. Brower L.P. 1994. From model to mimic: Age-dependent unpalatability in monarch butterflies. Experientia (Basel) 50(2). 176-181.
  • Sakai, W.H. 1994. Avian predation on the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (Nymphalidae: Danainae), at a California overwintering site. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society 48(2). 148-156.
  • Bowers, R.G, Begon, M. and Hodgkinson, D.E. 1993. Host-pathogen population cycles in forest insects? Lessons from simple models reconsidered. Oikos 67(3) 529-538.
  • Ritland, D.B. Brower L.P. 1993. A reassessment of the mimicry relationsihp among viceroys queens and monarchs in Florida. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Science Series (38). 129-139.
  • Leong KLH. Kaya H.K. Yoshimura M.A. Frey D.F. 1992. The occurrence and effect of a protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (Neogregarinida: Ophryocystidae) on overwintering monarch butterflies Danaus plexippus (Lepidoptera: Danaidae) from two California winter sites. Ecological Entomology 17(4). 338-342.
  • Zalucki, M.P. Brower, L.P. Malcolm, S.B. 1990. Oviposition by Danaus plexippus in relation to cardenolide content of three Asclepias species in the Southeastern USA. Ecological Entomology 15(2). 231-240.
  • Brower, L. 1988. Avian predation on the monarch butterfly and its implications for mimicry theory. American Naturalist 131. S4-S6.
  • Urquhart, F.A. 1987. The Monarch Butterfly: International Traveler. Nelson-Hall, Chicago, IL. 232 pp.
  • Brower, L.P. Calvert W.H. 1985. Foraging dynamics of bird predators on overwintering monarch butterflies Danaus plexippus in Mexico. Evolution 39(4). 852-868.
  • Faeth, S.H. and Simberloff, D. 1981. Population regulation of a new leafmining insect, Cameraria sp., at increased field densities. Ecology 62(3): 620-624.
  • Fink, L.S. and Brower L.P. 1981. Birds can overcome the cardenolide defense of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in Mexico. Nature 291(5810). 67-70.
  • Arnaud, P.H. Jr. (1978) A host-parasite catalog of North American Tachinidae (Diptera). U.S. Department of Agriculture Miscellaneous Publication No. 1319, Washington, D.C.
  • McLaughlin, R.E. and Myers, J. 1970. Ophryocystis elektroscirrha sp. n. a neogregarine pathogen of the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus (L.) and the Florida quen butterfly Danaus gilippus berenice Cramer. Journal of Protozoology. 17. 300-305.
  • Brewer, J. and Thomas, G.M. 1966. Causes of death encountered during rearing of Danaus plexippus (Danaidae). Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society. 20(4). 235-238.

Reproductive Biology

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Haribal M., J.Alan A. Renwick.1996. Oviposition stimulants for the monarch butterfly: Flavonol glycosides from Asclepias curassavica. Phytochemistry. Volume 41, Issue 1, January. Pages 139-144. ISSN 0031-9422,

Conservation

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

Migration

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Guerra PA, Gegear RJ, Reppert SM (2014). A magnetic compass aids monarch butterfly migration. Nat Commun 5:4164.
  • Zhan S, Zhang W, Niitepõld K, Hsu J, Haeger F, Zalucki MP, Altizer S, de Roode JC, Reppert SM, Kronforst MR (2014). The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning coloration. Nature 514:317-321.
  • Goehring, E. 1999. Environmental factors involved in reproductive diapause in monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus. Master's thesis. University of Minnesota.
  • Wassenaar, L. I. and K. A. Hobson. 1998. Natal origins of migratory monarch butterflies at wintering colonies in Mexico: New isotopic evidence. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95: 15436-15439.
  • Schmidt-Koenig, K. 1985. Migration strategies of monarch butterflies. In Migration: Mechanisms and adaptive significance (ed. M. A. Rankin), p. 786-798. Austin, TX: University of Texas Contribution in Marine Science (Suppl. 27).
  • Kanz, J. E. 1977. The orientation of migrant and non-migrant monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus (L.). Psyche 84: 120-141.

Human Impact

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

Overwintering

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Van Hook, T. 1993. Non-random mating in monarch butterflies overwintering in Mexico. pp. 49-60. In Malcolm, S. B. & M. P. Zalucki, (Eds.), Biology and Conservation of the Monarch Butterfly. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, California.

Education & Outreach

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

Global Distribution

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • Zhan S, Zhang W, Niitepõld K, Hsu J, Haeger F, Zalucki MP, Altizer S, de Roode JC, Reppert SM, Kronforst MR (2014). The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning coloration. Nature 514:317-321.
  • Gibbs, George. 1994. The Monarch Butterfly. Auckland, New Zealand: Reed Publishing.
  • R.I. Vane-Wright. 1993. The Columbus Hypothesis: An Explanation for the Dramatic 19th Century Range Expansion of the Monarch Butterfly. pp. 179-186 in Biology and Conservation of the Monarch Butterfly. Los Angeles: Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.
  • Ackery, P.R., and R.I. Vane-Wright. 1984. Milkweed Butterflies: Their Cladisitics and Biology. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Vital Statistics/Measuring

Monarch Lab Publications

Other References

  • McCord, J. W., and Andre K. Davis. 2012. Characteristics of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) that stopover at a site in coastal South Carolina during fall migration. Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera. 45: 1-8.
  • Cockrell BJ, Malcolm SB, Brower LP. 1993. Time, temperature, and latitudinal constraints on the annual recolonization of eastern North America by the monarch butterfly. In: Malcolm SB, Zalucki MP, eds. Biology and conservation of the monarch butterfly. Los Angeles : Publications of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 233–251.
  • Van Hook, T. 1993. Non-random mating in monarch butterflies overwintering in Mexico. pp. 49-60. In Malcolm, S. B. & M. P. Zalucki, (Eds.), Biology and Conservation of the Monarch Butterfly. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, California.
  • © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy